Donate

                                       Join Us

COVID-19 Guidelines

3/26/2020

Further to the COVID-19 Guidance provided earlier this week I am providing this update to address Equine Boarding Facilities.

"After receiving multiple inquiries, I sought clarification and have received from Governor Beshear’s office that equine boarding facilities are defined to be agriculture and in caring for horses is an essential business.  With this determination, equine boarding facilities are currently permitted to remain operational so long as the facility can implement and follow the direction given by Kentucky Office State Veterinarian that includes maintaining/practicing social distancing as well as limiting individuals in the facility at any given time to a minimum and to those that have a defined need/purpose/benefit.   Additionally, all tools and equipment handled by individuals is to be adequately cleansed/disinfected and frequent hand washing must occur.  Insuring compliance of the individual borders will be responsibility of the facility operator/manager.  This should not be interpreted to imply concession riding operations or other such retail businesses are permitted to operate"-Rusty Ford, Office of the State Veterinarian

To: Equine Industry Representatives and Veterinary Practitioners

From: E.S. Rusty Ford, Equine Operations Consultant – KY Office State Veterinarian Date: March 24, 2020

Subject: COVID-19 – Farm, Veterinary and Other Equine Activities

The public health threat presented by COVID-19, otherwise known as coronavirus, is impacting all, and the equine industry is not immune to it. Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles, State Veterinarian Dr. Bob Stout and I are appreciative of the proactive steps our agricultural industries have taken thus far. Only by working together as we are can help insure our own health and that of our industry. Protecting the health of ourselves, families, friends, employees and one another is of paramount importance.

As veterinarians, technicians, farm managers, and horsemen-we are knowledgeable and familiar with biosecurity. We have all worked through disease outbreaks, quarantines, and understand the basic principles to mitigating disease transmission in horses. The environment we are in today though, does necessitate applying and expanding these principles. It is our mutual goal to see the standards defined below are adopted, implemented and practiced by all farms, practitioners and horsemen working together in our industry here in Kentucky.

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture's Office of State Veterinarian has developed the following guidance to adjust equine activities to better protect public health during this time. 

General Guidance:

o If you feel sick, stay home. Do not work. Contact your medical provider.

o If your children are sick, keep them at home. Do not send them to school. Contact your medical provider.

If someone in your household has tested positive for the virus, keep the entire household at home. Do not go to work. Do not go to school. Contact your medical provider.

o  If you are an older person, stay home and away from other people.

o If you are person with a serious underlying health condition that can put you at increased risk (for example, a condition that impairs your lung or heart function or weakens your immune system), stay home and away from other people.

  • Limit individuals from unnecessarily congregating and maintaining a responsible social distance between individuals. Social distancing is the phrase of the month and is defined as a 6 foot perimeter/space between individuals.
  • Please keep up to date with the Centers for Disease Control Guidance, which includes best practices during this time.

Caring For Our Horses and Industry:

Dr. Stout and I have been speaking with equine practitioners, farm managers, farm employees and other individuals in the industry to best define the path forward. We have compiled the following best practices.

1.  Barns should be open to allow as much exchange of fresh air as possible

2.  Equipment (leads, shanks, twitches, grooming etc.): Should be assigned to a barn and not passed to different individuals. This equipment should be cleaned and disinfected daily.

3. Surfaces (desk, rails, gates etc.) having contact with individuals or equipment should be cleaned and disinfected frequently.

4. Paperwork: Paperwork should be completed and submitted electronically.

5. Communication should be via phone call, email or text.

6. Veterinarians/Veterinary Assistants (and others who visit farms daily): Limit the number of individuals assisting the veterinarian. Veterinarians and other individuals who visit multiple facilities daily must understand and accept the additional steps they must take to avoid becoming contaminated and potentially transferring the contagion to other environments.

a.  Veterinarians, assistants, and others should take their temperature 2x daily and not report to work if an elevated fever is detected. Any fever detected should be reported to a supervisor or manager.

b. Veterinarians, assistants, and others should wear gloves, coveralls and consider wearing a mask when deemed appropriate. These would be changed between farms and cleansed for reuse at end of day.

c. When feasible, the vet assistant should be the individual holding/restraining the horse.

d. Palpation – The manner by which you palpate or examine a mare is based on your assessment and familiarity with the individual animal. Ideally, the tail would be pulled and tied or the assistant wearing gloves would hold the tail. Alternatively, a farm employee could serve this role so long as he or she has the proper PPE while maintaining the defined social distance. Our objective is to minimize the number of individuals working in close proximity.

e. The veterinarian assistant should cleanse the gloved hand or use new gloves moving horse to horse.  The veterinarian should change or cleanse gloves between horses.

f. Avoid transfer of paperwork – reports support contagions are easily transferred to/from paper products. All administrative processes should be completed electronically when possible. This includes daily worksheets, payment.

7. Farm Employees (there should be no physical contact between individuals and they should practice social distancing).

a. Farm employees should check their temperatures 2x daily and if an elevated fever is detected they should report the fever to their supervisor and not interact with veterinarian.

b. Where possible, employees working on the farm should be ‘consistently compartmentalized’, meaning individuals day-to-day routines should be that they work with the same people daily, and do not work different shifts having interaction with new or different individuals.

c. Ideally, there would be one farm employee per barn working with the veterinarian. This individual should be at or near the head of the horse and away from the veterinarian. The veterinarian or accompanying assistant is holding tail.

d. Foals requiring restraint, will be attended to by the veterinarian’s assistant.

Implementing these practices, and any other action you can take to eliminate people from congregating in common areas will be beneficial and could be critical in our ability to continue business is as normal manner as possible. I welcome any additional recommendations you might have.

For additional information regarding the COVID-19 status in KY please visit  https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19.

Guidelines, updates and information offered by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture can be viewed at www.kyagr.com/covid19

Para: Representantes de la industria equina y veterinarios

De: E.S. Rusty Ford, Consultor de Operaciones Equinas - Veterinario del Estado de la Oficina de KY

Cita: 24 de marzo de 2020

Sujeto: COVID-19 - Actividades de granja, veterinarias y otras actividades equinas

La amenaza a la salud pública que presenta el COVID-19, también conocido como coronavirus, está afectando a todos, y la industria equina no es inmune a ella. El Comisionado de Agricultura, Dr. Ryan Quarles, el veterinario del Estado, Dr. Bob Stout, y yo apreciamos las medidas proactivas que nuestras industrias agrícolas han tomado hasta ahora. Sólo trabajando juntos como lo estamos haciendo podemos ayudar a asegurar nuestra propia salud y la de nuestra industria. Proteger la salud de nosotros mismos, de nuestras familias, amigos, empleados y de los demás es de suma importancia. Como veterinarios, técnicos, gerentes de granjas y jinetes - estamos informados y familiarizados con la bioseguridad. Todos hemos trabajado en brotes de enfermedades, cuarentenas y entendemos los principios básicos para mitigar la transmisión de enfermedades en los caballos. Sin embargo, el entorno en el que nos encontramos hoy en día requiere la aplicación y ampliación de estos principios. Es nuestra meta mutua ver que los estándares definidos a continuación sean adoptados, implementados y practicados por todas las granjas, profesionales y jinetes que trabajan juntos en nuestra industria aquí en Kentucky.

La Oficina del Veterinario del Estado del Departamento de Agricultura de Kentucky ha desarrollado la siguiente guía para ajustar las actividades equinas para proteger mejor la salud pública durante este tiempo. Guía general:

Familiarícese y familiarice a sus empleados con las Directrices sobre el Coronavirus para América 

  • Si te sientes mal, quédate en casa. No trabajes. Comuníquese con su proveedor médico.  
  • Si sus hijos están enfermos, manténgalos en casa. No los envíe a la escuela. Comuníquese con su proveedor médico. 
  • Si alguien en su casa ha dado positivo en la prueba del virus, mantenga a toda la familia en casa. No vaya a trabajar. No vaya a la escuela. Póngase en contacto con su proveedor de servicios médicos. 
  • Si es una persona mayor, quédese en casa y no se acerque a otras personas.  
  • Si es una persona con una condición de salud subyacente grave que puede ponerle en un mayor riesgo (por ejemplo, una condición que deteriore su función pulmonar o cardíaca o debilite su sistema inmunológico), quédese en casa y lejos de otras personas. 

Limite a las personas a no congregarse innecesariamente y a mantener una distancia social responsable entre ellas. El distanciamiento social es la frase del mes y se define como un perímetro/espacio de 6 pies entre los individuos.

Por favor, manténgase al día con la Guía de los Centros de Control de Enfermedades, que incluye las mejores prácticas durante este tiempo.

Cuidar de nuestros caballos y de la industria: El Dr. Stout y yo hemos estado hablando con profesionales de los caballos, administradores de granjas, empleados de granjas y otros individuos de la industria para definir mejor el camino a seguir. Hemos recopilado las siguientes mejores prácticas.

1. Los establos deben estar abiertos para permitir el mayor intercambio de aire fresco posible

2. Equipo (cables, vástagos, tijeras, cepillos, etc.): Debe asignarse a un granero y no pasar a diferentes individuos. Este equipo debe ser limpiado y desinfectado diariamente.

3. Las superficies (escritorio, rieles, puertas, etc.) que tengan contacto con individuos o equipo deben ser limpiadas y desinfectadas frecuentemente.

4. Papeleo: El papeleo debe ser completado y enviado electrónicamente.

5. La comunicación debe realizarse mediante llamada telefónica, correo electrónico o texto.

6. Veterinarios/Asistentes veterinarios (y otros que visiten las granjas diariamente): Limitar el número de personas que asisten al veterinario. Los veterinarios y otras personas que visitan diariamente múltiples instalaciones deben comprender y aceptar las medidas adicionales que deben tomar para evitar la contaminación y la posible transferencia del contagio a otros entornos.

a. Los veterinarios, asistentes y otros deben tomar su temperatura 2 veces al día y no presentarse a trabajar si se detecta una fiebre elevada. Cualquier fiebre que se detecte debe ser reportada a un supervisor o gerente.

b. Los veterinarios, asistentes y otras personas deben usar guantes, overoles y considerar el uso de una máscara cuando se considere apropiado. Éstos se cambiarían entre las granjas y se limpiarían para su reutilización al final del día.

c. Cuando sea factible, el asistente del veterinario debería ser la persona que sostiene/restringe el caballo.

d. Palpación - La manera de palpar o examinar una yegua se basa en su evaluación y familiaridad con el animal individual. Lo ideal sería que la cola se tirara y se atara o que el asistente con guantes la sujetara. Alternativamente, un empleado de la granja podría cumplir este papel siempre y cuando tenga el EPP adecuado y mantenga la distancia social definida. Nuestro objetivo es minimizar el número de individuos que trabajan en proximidad.

e. El asistente veterinario debe limpiar la mano enguantada o usar guantes nuevos moviendo caballo a caballo. El veterinario debe cambiar o limpiar los guantes entre los caballos.

f. Evitar la transferencia de papeleo - los informes de apoyo a los contagios se transfieren fácilmente a/de los productos de papel. Todos los procesos administrativos deben ser completados electrónicamente

7. Empleados de la granja (no debe haber contacto físico entre los individuos y deben practicar el distanciamiento social). a. Los empleados de la granja deben revisar sus temperaturas 2 veces al día y si se detecta una fiebre elevada deben reportar la fiebre a su supervisor y no interactuar con el veterinario.

b. Cuando sea posible, los empleados que trabajan en la granja deben estar "consistentemente compartimentados", lo que significa que las rutinas diarias de los individuos deben ser que trabajen con la misma gente diariamente, y no trabajen en diferentes turnos teniendo interacción con individuos nuevos o diferentes.

c. Lo ideal sería que hubiera un empleado de la granja por cada establo trabajando con el veterinario. Este individuo debería estar en o cerca de la cabeza del caballo y lejos del veterinario. El veterinario o el ayudante acompañante está sosteniendo la cola.

d. Los potros que requieran ser sujetados, serán atendidos por el asistente del veterinario.

La implementación de estas prácticas, y cualquier otra acción que se pueda tomar para eliminar a las personas de la congregación en las áreas comunes será beneficiosa y podría ser crítica en nuestra

capacidad de continuar el negocio de la manera más normal posible. Agradezco cualquier recomendación adicional que pueda tener.

Para obtener información adicional sobre el estado de COVID-19 en KY, por favor visite https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19.

Las directrices, actualizaciones e información ofrecidas por el Departamento de Agricultura de Kentucky pueden verse en www.kyagr.com/covid19.

To: Equine Industry Representatives- Distribute to your members or others you feel might benefit From: E.S. Rusty Ford, Equine Operations Consultant – KY Office State Veterinarian

Date: March 21, 2020

Subject: COVID-19 – Equine Activities

The threat that COVID-19 virus poses is impacting each of our lives daily. The efforts to contain the virus by mitigating further transmission is dependent on each of us practicing the guidelines issued by Kentucky’s Department of Public Health and the actions/restrictions initiated by Governor Andy Beshear. Specifically, limiting individuals from unnecessarily congregating and maintaining space (i.e. social distance is the phrase of the week and is defined as a 6’ perimeter/space) between individuals when it is necessary to be together is a critical component of the mitigating strategies. Commissioner Quarles, Dr. Stout and I genuinely appreciate the proactive steps our agricultural industries have taken thus far.

BREEDING SHED ACTIVITY: Throughout the week I have spoken with and/or visited a number of breeding sheds to review the practices in place. With vans and individuals visiting multiple facilities each day we do recommend adopting standard practices in how we manage people and horses visiting sheds. Dr. Stout and I are of the shared opinion that implementing the following practices will be advantageous to our maintaining breeding shed activity.

1. Submission of documentations for mares booked to be bred would best be done electronically. We’ve seen numerous reports where handled paper can be contaminated.

2.  Eliminate outside individuals (van drivers and mare attendants) from coming into the prep area and shed. To accomplish this the van would arrive, the mare would be offloaded and handed off to a shed employee (using the shed’s shank) who would handle the mare through the process. The van driver and anyone accompanying the mare to the shed should remain outside in the parking area while maintaining social distance with other individuals.

3. After cover, the mare would be returned to the loading area and handed off to the attendant for loading onto the van. If there is need for a mare’s attendant to witness the cover, this should be accomplished from outside – looking in, videotaped or virtually.

4.  The shank would be cleaned before returning to the shed or reuse and attendant would wash hands.

5.  Breeding equipment (leg straps, collars, boots etc.) would be cleaned before reuse.

6. Additionally, maintaining enhanced biosecurity in our daily activity is essential to all of these mitigations.

Implementing these practices, and any other action you can take to eliminate people from congregating in common areas will be beneficial and could be critical in our ability to continue transporting horses to/from sheds.  I welcome any additional recommendations you might have.

For additional information regarding the COVID-19 status in KY please visit  https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19. Guidelines, updates and information offered by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture can be viewed at www.kyagr.com/communications/covid-19-ky-agriculture-  updates.html

Para: Representantes de la industria equina - Distribuya a sus miembros o a otros que considere que puedan beneficiarse

De: E.S. Rusty Ford, Consultor de Operaciones Equinas - Veterinario del Estado de la Oficina de KY

Cita: 21 de marzo de 2020

Sujeto: COVID-19 - Actividades con caballos

La amenaza que supone el virus COVID-19 está afectando a cada una de nuestras vidas diariamente. Los esfuerzos para contener el virus mitigando una mayor transmisión dependen de que cada uno de nosotros practique las directrices emitidas por el Departamento de Salud Pública de Kentucky y las acciones/restricciones iniciadas por el Gobernador Andy Beshear. Específicamente, limitar a los individuos a no congregarse innecesariamente y mantener el espacio (es decir, la distancia social es la frase de la semana y se define como un perímetro/espacio de 6') entre los individuos cuando es necesario estar juntos es un componente crítico de las estrategias de mitigación. El Comisionado Quarles, el Dr. Stout y yo realmente apreciamos los pasos proactivos que nuestras industrias agrícolas han tomado hasta ahora.

ACTIVIDAD DE CRIANZA: A lo largo de la semana he hablado y/o visitado varios cobertizos de cría para revisar las prácticas en vigor. Con furgonetas e individuos visitando múltiples instalaciones cada día, recomendamos adoptar prácticas estándar en cómo manejamos a la gente y a los caballos que visitan los cobertizos. El Dr. Stout y yo compartimos la opinión de que la implementación de las siguientes prácticas será ventajosa para mantener la actividad de los establos de cría.

1. La presentación de la documentación para las yeguas reservadas para ser criadas se haría mejor electrónicamente. Hemos visto numerosos informes en los que el papel manipulado puede estar contaminado.

2. Eliminar a los individuos externos (conductores de furgonetas y asistentes de las yeguas) de entrar en el área de preparación y el cobertizo. Para ello, la furgoneta llegaría, la yegua se descargaría y se entregaría a un empleado del cobertizo (usando el mango del cobertizo) que se encargaría de la yegua durante el proceso. El conductor de la furgoneta y cualquiera que acompañe a la yegua al cobertizo debe permanecer afuera en el área de estacionamiento mientras mantiene una distancia social con otros individuos.

3. Una vez cubierta, la yegua sería devuelta a la zona de carga y entregada al encargado para que la cargue en la furgoneta. Si es necesario que el asistente de la yegua sea testigo de la cobertura, esto debe hacerse desde afuera, mirando hacia adentro, en video o virtualmente.

4. El jarrete se limpiaría antes de volver al cobertizo o se reutilizaría y el encargado se lavaría las manos.

5. l equipo de cría (correas de las piernas, collares, botas, etc.) se limpiaría antes de su reutilización.

6. Además, mantener una mayor bioseguridad en nuestra actividad diaria es esencial para todas estas mitigaciones.

La implementación de estas prácticas, y cualquier otra acción que se pueda tomar para eliminar la congestión de personas en áreas comunes será beneficiosa y podría ser crítica en nuestra capacidad de continuar transportando caballos a/desde los cobertizos. Agradezco cualquier recomendación adicional que pueda tener.

Para obtener información adicional sobre la situación de COVID-19 en KY, por favor visite https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19. Las directrices, actualizaciones e información ofrecidas por el Departamento de Agricultura de Kentucky pueden verse en www.kyagr.com/communications/covid-19-kyagriculture-updates.html.

Traducción realizada con la versión gratuita del traductor www.DeepL.com/Translator

Quick Links:

Call or Fax Us

Office: 859-367-0509

Fax: 866-618-3837

Address:

4037 Iron Works Parkway Suite 120
Lexington, Kentucky 40511

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software