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  • 10/01/2019 10:24 AM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (October 1, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council has announced they will be awarding two  $1,500 scholarships to Kentucky students already attending college, or accepted into a college who have demonstrated academic success, Kentucky equine industry involvement and community service for the Spring 2020 Semester.  

    The Equine Scholarship will be awarded to students currently enrolled with a university or college in Kentucky in an equine-related major or a horse-related program, or a student accepted into an equine related major or program to start in the Spring 2020 semester.  Some examples of courses of studies for which the scholarships are intended are Equine Science/Studies, Equine Business Management, Equine Therapy, Pre-Veterinarian, Farrier Training, Professional Jockey Certificate, Professional Horsemen’s Certificate, etc.  Applicants must be student members of the Kentucky Horse Council.

    “The Kentucky Horse Council is thrilled to once again be offering scholarships to college students in Kentucky,” says Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director Katy Ross.  “Education is an important part of our mission and we look forward to supporting the efforts of a deserving student as they explore a future in the Kentucky equine industry.  Our application has changed slightly, but we encourage all applicants, new and past, to apply!”     

    Applications for the scholarship will be accepted until November 1, 2019.  The scholarship will be awarded on December 2. The student is required to be a member of the Kentucky Horse Council. Student memberships are free and interested students may sign up at www.kentuckyhorse.org.

    To download the scholarship application, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org.

  • 09/23/2019 11:21 AM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (September 23, 2019) -A diverse group of equine enthusiasts escaped the high temperatures in Lexington, KY, for an air-conditioned evening attending the summer session of the Kentucky Equine Networking Meeting (KENA). Presented by the Kentucky Horse Council and held at The Red Mile Clubhouse, a panel of horse-care experts gathered to discuss a topic that has been at the forefront of many horse owner's minds this summer: How to help their horses cope with the oppressive heat and humidity in Central Kentucky.

    Though the spring of 2019 began with an extensive amount of rain, moisture in the Bluegrass this summer been minimal, and the heat has come on with an intensity that's been difficult to tolerate for even the most-acclimated horses and humans. Exacerbating the issue is the intense humidity that has enveloped most of the state.

    Dr. Bob Coleman, an equine extension specialist with the University of Kentucky, spoke to attendees about temperature and its effect on horses, both while they are in the field and when they're asked for physical exertion. He explained that temperature alone is not the only variable that can affect a horse's ability to sweat to keep itself cool: humidity, wind speed and the amount of sunshine also affects heat dissipation in horses.

    The temperature and the relative humidity as a percentage can be combined to calculate the comfort index for horses, Coleman explained. This number will assist in determining if it's too hot to exercise a horse. If the sum is below 130, thermoregulation should not be a concern. When the comfort index is between 130 and 150, horses will sweat, but they can exercise without major problems. When the comfort index exceeds 150 and the humidity is greater than 75 percent, heat dissipation may be an issue and riders should monitor their horses carefully. If the comfort index exceeds 180, a horse should not exercised, as it will be unable to dissipate enough heat to stay safe.

    Nicole Bianco, a registered dietitian and graduate assistant with UK athletics, addressed potential human-specific issues when working or riding in the heat. Dehydration is a serious concern for anyone exerting themselves in heat and humidity, she said. Dehydration can present as dizziness, fatigue or nausea, and can lead to decreased stamina and make people more-prone to injury. She suggested that people who will be working or exercising in the heat hydrate first with water, but they can also drink milk, juice, sports drinks or tea. Eating fruits and veggies that contain a lot of water will also help replace fluid lost to sweat. Paying attention to how one feels and acting accordingly is imperative for human safety when temperatures soar, Nicole said; this could include stopping work, getting out of the sun or entering an area with air conditioning.

    Dr. Bruce Howard is the Interim Equine Medical Director for the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission. Howard addressed potential problems racehorses can encounter when racing during summer months. Howard noted that his main role is to keep both horses and humans safe; the decision to cancel racing is not one that is taken lightly, and he confers with stewards and track management when heat indices rise.

    Ellis Park racetrack in Henderson, KY, sits in in a literally bowl of land, where the heat just sits on the track, Howard say. When it's 92 or 93 degrees outside and most other tracks are still running, Howard considers the weather conditions carefully: "If it's 92 or 93 out and there's no wind or clouds, it will be too hot to race at Ellis," he says.

    The "magical" heat index number for mandatory racing cancellation is 108 Howard says; at 105 track management gets worried. Horses do fine racing on hot tracks when they're given the opportunity to adapt, he notes. It's the horses that are not from the area that ship in to race that cause him concern. Howard keeps a close eye out for horses that are in heat distress; these horses will hold their ears to the side, have a dull eye, violently swish their tail and kick with their hind legs. A horse in heat distress won't drink, but the condition is rarely fatal when addressed as soon as possible, he explains.

    The three KENA panelists provided attendees with useful information on how to keep themselves and their horses safe as temperatures continue to climb throughout the late-summer months.

    The next KENA meeting will take place on November 12 at the Red Mile Clubhouse. Sponsors of the educational series include Dinsmore Equine Law Group, Neogen Corporation, Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, University of Louisville Equine Industry Program, McBrayer Law Firm and Red Mile.

  • 09/04/2019 10:47 AM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (September 4, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council announces Prosecco for Ponies, a brunch fundraiser to be held at New Vocations at Mereworth Farm on October 12, 2019 at 10:30 am.

    Prosecco for Ponies is a brunch event to benefit the Kentucky Horse Council.  Brunch will be catered by Local Feed out of Georgetown, KY and there will also be a mimosa and bloody mary bar.  There will also be a silent auction.  Funds from the event will benefit the Save Our Horses Fund, the welfare fund of the Kentucky Horse Council, which enables the KHC to provide hay and feed assistance, gelding and euthanasia vouchers, transportation assistance and more to owners and horses in Kentucky.     

    “We are excited to announce the first Prosecco for Ponies event,” said Katy Ross, Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director. “This brunch event is a fun way to kick off your Saturday! Come out to the beautiful facility at New Vocations at Mereworth Farm, enjoy a delicious brunch and head off to the races.”

    Prosecco for Ponies is made possible due to the support of generous sponsors.  Sponsors include Dinsmore Equine Law Group, Excel Equine Feeds, Darby Dan Stallions,  Kentucky Eagle, Kentucky Health Solutions, Kentucky Performance Products, Pyrois Media, Standlee, Thoroughbred Daily News, Horse Racing Nation, Neogen and the Law Office of Franklin Paisley.

    For more information, to purchase tickets, or for partnership and sponsorship opportunities, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org, or contact the Kentucky Horse Council at 859-367-0509 or director@kentuckyhorse.org.


  • 08/28/2019 1:12 PM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (August 28, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council has announced the recipients of two  $1,500 scholarships to Kentucky students already attending college, or accepted into a college who have demonstrated academic success, equine industry involvement and community service for the Fall 2019 Semester.  

    The Equine Scholarship are available to students currently enrolled with a university or college in Kentucky in an equine-related major or a horse-related program, or a student accepted into an equine related major or program to start in the Fall 2019 semester.  The Fall 2019 Scholarships have been awarded to Madeline Sparks and Brittany Rust. 

    Madeline Sparks, of Cynthiana, Kentucky, is a freshman at Midway University studying Equine Rehabilitation and Equine Management.  Madeline has a long record of participation in Future Farmers of America, as well as the American Quarter Horse Youth Association, Harrison County Saddle and Spurs Club, 4H and the Pinto Organization of Kentucky, among others.  Her academic excellence, many awards, and club involvement combined with her impact on the Kentucky equine community has made her a worthy recipient of the scholarship.

    Brittany Rust, from Cold Springs, Kentucky, is a junior at Morehead State University studying Pre-Veterinary Medicine.  Brittany has been riding and showing horses her entire life and is heavily involved with the Northern Kentucky Horse Network as well as Future Farmers of America.  She is currently involved with the Appalachian Horse Revival as well as the promotion of the Smokey Valley Horse. Brittany is a two-time recipient of the KHC Equine Scholarship. 


    “The Kentucky Horse Council is honored to present these scholarships to two young women who are already making such an impact on the equine community in Kentucky,” says Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director Katy Ross.  “These students have managed to balance their studies with their continued participation in the horse industry.  Their futures are extremely bright and we are excited to see what they do next!”     

    Since resurrecting the scholarship program in 2017, the Kentucky Horse Council has awarded scholarships to students attending the University of Kentucky, Midway University, Morehead State University, Murray State University and Eastern Kentucky University. Scholarships are open to all student members of the Kentucky Horse Council. Student memberships are free and interested students may sign up at www.kentuckyhorse.org.


  • 08/01/2019 2:21 PM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (August 1, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council has announced the topic for the August Kentucky Equine Networking Association (KENA) dinner. The August topic will be “Handling Heat.” The dinner will be held on August 20, 2019, at The Red Mile Clubhouse in Lexington, Ky. KENA is a dinner and educational series open to equine professionals, horse owners, and riders and will feature a networking reception from 5:30-6:00 PM, followed by dinner with the main speakers from 6:00-8:00 PM.

    As we reach the middle of a hot summer, the August KENA topic will be “Handling Heat.”  The speakers for this dinner will be Dr. Robert Coleman, Nicole Bianco, and a veterinarian. 

    Dr. Coleman, an extension specialist and professor in the University of Kentucky’s Equine Ag Program, will discuss how to reduce heat stress for horses.  Nicole Bianco, a registered dietician at the University of Kentucky, will discuss best practices for riders and a veterinarian will discuss conditioning and hydration for horses. 

     “We are having a very hot summer,” says Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director Katy Ross.  “This does not slow down the show season or temper our desire to ride or go out on the trails.  This diverse panel will touch on all of the issues affecting equine and human athletes in Kentucky due to this heat and humidity.”

    KENA is charged with the mission of providing an educational and social venue for equine professionals and horse enthusiasts from all disciplines. Organized by the Kentucky Horse Council and supported by the University of Kentucky Ag Equine Program, KENA provides the opportunity for attendees to share ideas, business strategies and knowledge, and to obtain up-to-date information on horse and farm management and on issues affecting the equine industry.

    The Kentucky Equine Networking Association welcomes all Kentucky horse owners, professionals and enthusiasts to attend the August 20th event. For details and reservations, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

  • 07/18/2019 2:04 PM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (July 18, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council has announced they will be awarding two  $1,500 scholarships to Kentucky students already attending college, or accepted into a college who have demonstrated academic success, equine industry involvement and community service for the Fall 2019 Semester.  

    The Equine Scholarship will be awarded to students currently enrolled with a university or college in Kentucky in an equine-related major or a horse-related program, or a student accepted into an equine related major or program to start in the Fall 2019 semester.  Some examples of courses of studies for which the scholarships are intended are Equine Science/Studies, Equine Business Management, Equine Therapy, Pre-Veterinarian, Farrier Training, Professional Jockey Certificate, Professional Horsemen’s Certificate, etc.  Applicants must be student members of the Kentucky Horse Council.

    “The Kentucky Horse Council is thrilled to once again be offering scholarships to college students in Kentucky,” says Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director Katy Ross.  “Education is an important part of our mission and we look forward to supporting the efforts of a deserving student as they explore a future in the equine industry.  Our application has changed slightly, but we encourage all applicants, new and past, to apply!”     

    Applications for the scholarship will be accepted until August 10, 2019.  The scholarship will be awarded on August 20. The student is required to be a member of the Kentucky Horse Council. Student memberships are free and interested students may sign up at www.kentuckyhorse.org.

    To download the scholarship application, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org.

  • 07/17/2019 9:44 AM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (July 17, 2019) - The Kentucky Horse Council announces Large Animal Emergency Rescue Training to be held at the Kentucky Horse Park from September 20-22, 2019.

    The LAER training will be taught by 4Hooves Large Animal Services, LLC and instructors Justin and Tori McLeod. Both instructors have extensive experience with equine and livestock as well as working as emergency responders. They also operate the North Carolina Specialized Mobile Animal Rescue Team as well as being instructors in technical large animal emergency rescue.

    The course is geared towards veterinarians, first responders and emergency personnel as well as animal control officers and any horse owner or industry professional. The course will cover subject matter from animal behavior, safety considerations, restraints, containment, entrapments, motor vehicle accidents and overturned trailers, barn and wildfires, unstable ground, water rescues, and natural disaster preparation and response.   Specialized instruction will be given to participants based on their background and auditors are welcome.

    "We are excited to be offering this training again this year," said Katy Ross, Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director. "There is a real need for Large Animal Emergency Rescue training in this part of the country. It is an excellent opportunity for veterinarians, volunteers and first responders to receive in-depth, technical training for situations that unfortunately arise too frequently. Last year we had a full training with 35 participants ranging from mounted police officers to firemen to veterinarians. These three groups really learned how to work together to best handle emergency situations. We look forward to providing this training to a great group again this year!"

    Continuing education credits for veterinarians are approved. This course is being sponsored by the Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association, Lexington Equine Medical, Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital and the Kentucky Horse Park. More sponsors are being accepted at this time.

    For more information, to register for the class, or for partnership and sponsorship opportunities, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org, or contact the Kentucky Horse Council at 859-367-0509.

    For registrations visit https://kentuckyhorse.org/event-3438034

  • 05/30/2019 1:49 PM | Anonymous

    Mud Management Key To Equine Health And Safety During Wet  Weather

    May 30, 2019 – Lexington, KY – An attentive group of equine owners and caretakers gathered at The Red Mile Clubhouse in Lexington, KY, last week to learn how to better care for their farms and their horses during wet weather. The Kentucky Equine Networking Association (KENA) session, presented by the Kentucky Horse Council, hosted a panel of experts who addressed a pressing equine operations issue: How to manage mud.

    Soggy conditions seem to have become the norm in the Bluegrass: 2018 was one of the wettest years on record and model projections indicate that wetter-than-average weather will persist throughout the remainder of the century. To assist horse and farm owners in their quest to provide the best care they can for their equines, Dr. Robert Coleman and Krista Lea of the University of Kentucky offered insights into wet-weather care for fields and shelters; Dr. Craig Lesser of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital informed attendees of possible health issues facing equines that spend time outdoors in wet weather.  

    Dr. Bob Coleman, PhD, PAS, Extension Horse Specialist at the University of Kentucky, spoke to KENA attendees about ways in which they can modify their farms to better handle precipitation. He noted that water runoff comes from the roofs of buildings, roads and the way the land naturally drains. The installation of gutters to divert the water away from buildings, as well as the use of swales and culverts, can help eliminate standing water.

    At most farms, the heavily trafficked areas are the most prone to mud buildup, including around gates, shelters, waterers and feeders. Coleman suggested constructing pads in as many of these areas as possible; pad construction entails the removal of soil and the placement of fabric and rock to encourage water to drain down and away from where horses congregate.

    To attendee’s delight, Coleman referenced some ways in which farm owners may receive financial help in installing these pads, though he noted that some programs have specific requirements. The possible financial assistance initiatives included County Agriculture Investment Programs (CAIP) and local extension office programs.

    “When it comes to managing mud on horse farms, there is no silver bullet, no product or practice that solely eliminates mud, but careful management can minimize the size and severity of the issue,” said Krista Lea, research analyst with the Forage Extension Program at the University of Kentucky regarding the impact mud has on pastures and fields. “Whether managing grazing or loafing areas, maintaining grasses in a pasture requires occasional rest, good soil fertility and, when needed, the addition of desirable grasses through proper seeding.”

    Lea went on to detail that field rest periods should be a minimum of one week, but that resting for two to three weeks is ideal. Field soil samples should be taken every 2 to 3 years and only the needed amendments applied, she said. However, nitrogen can be applied twice every fall without a soil test, at 60 to 80 pounds of urea per acre, she explained, but cautioned that no amount of fertilizer can make up for poor management. Though traditionally a mixture of tall fescue, Kentucky bluegrass, orchardgrass, white clover and some ryegrass is planted in September, farm owners can seed just ryegrass during much of the year to quickly fill in high-traffic areas for short-term cover. 

    Dr. Craig Lesser, DVM, CF at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, spoke about hoof conditions that might arise with an abundance of mud. These issues included thrush and abscesses, which many KENA attendees were familiar with, and a complication that may arise from chronic abscesses: Septic Pedal Osteitis. An infection of the coffin bone, the treatment for this condition is much more intense that with a traditional abscess; treatment may include antibiotics (either systemic or used in regional perfusion), specific shoeing or even surgery.

    A more-unusual condition that may occur in muddy conditions is quittor. An infection in and around the collateral cartilage, this painful condition may require antibiotic treatment, as well as possibly surgical debridement and drain placement.

    White line disease can cause lameness, abscesses, rotation of the coffin bone or the sloughing of the hoof capsule—none of which should be taken lightly. Treatment may include supportive shoeing, but more-intense cases may require debridement.

    Lesser also discussed pastern dermatitis and thrush. Though each condition he discussed could be helped by the ability to keep the horse’s legs and feet clean and dry, Lesser noted that this is not always possible, especially for equines that live outside. He noted that diligent, daily care will allow horse owners and caretakers to address a hoof issue when it first appears, hopefully allowing for a less-invasive treatment to solve the problem.

    The three KENA panelists offered attendees targeted strategies to help manage mud on their farm and to encourage happy, healthy horses—no matter what the weather brings.

    The next KENA meeting will take place on August 20 at the Red Mile Clubhouse.

    Sponsors of the educational series include Dinsmore Equine Law Group, Neogen Corporation, Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, University of Louisville Equine Industry Program, McBrayer Law Firm and Red Mile.


  • 04/24/2019 9:48 AM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (April 22, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council has announced the topic for the May Kentucky Equine Networking Association (KENA) dinner. The May topic will be “Managing Mud.” The dinner will be held on May 21, 2019, at The Red Mile Clubhouse in Lexington, Ky. KENA is a dinner and educational series open to equine professionals, horse owners, and riders and will feature a networking reception from 5:30-6:00 PM, followed by dinner with the main speakers from 6:00-8:00 PM.

    With the unprecedented amount of rain that has hit Central Kentucky in the last year, the May KENA topic will be “Managing Mud.”  The speakers for this dinner will be Dr. Robert Coleman, Dr. Craig Lesser and Krista Lea. 

    Dr. Coleman, an extension specialist and professor in the University of Kentucky’s Equine Ag Program, will discuss high traffic pads and mud management.   Dr. Craig Lesser, a veterinarian and podiatrist at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, will discuss mud related conditions for your horse.  Krista Lea, a pasture management specialist in the UK Equine Ag Program, will discuss how to help your pastures recover from this weather and how to keep them going.

     “One of the things we kept hearing over the winter was how sick everyone was of the rain,” Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director Katy Ross.  “The large amount of precipitation we’ve received in Kentucky in the past year has caused issues across the agriculture industry and affects horses, from skin infections, to hoof issues, to pasture problems with large amounts of mud. This diverse panel will touch on all of the issues affecting horse owners in Kentucky due to the rainy weather.”

    KENA is charged with the mission of providing an educational and social venue for equine professionals and horse enthusiasts from all disciplines. Organized by the Kentucky Horse Council and supported by the University of Kentucky Ag Equine Program, KENA provides the opportunity for attendees to share ideas, business strategies and knowledge, and to obtain up-to-date information on horse and farm management and on issues affecting the equine industry.

    The Kentucky Equine Networking Association welcomes all Kentucky horse owners, professionals and enthusiasts to attend the May 21 event. For details and reservations, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

    ABOUT THE KENTUCKY HORSE COUNCIL - The Kentucky Horse Council is a non-profit organization dedicated, through education and leadership, to the protection and development of the Kentucky equine community. The Kentucky Horse Council provides educational programs and information, outreach and communication to Kentucky horse owners and enthusiasts, equine professional networking opportunities through KENA, trail riding advocacy, health and welfare programs, and personal liability insurance and other membership benefits.  The specialty Kentucky Horse Council license plate, featuring a foal lying in the grass, provides the primary source of revenue for KHC programs                        

    - END -

  • 04/02/2019 11:02 AM | Anonymous

    Lexington, KY (April 2, 2019) – The Kentucky Horse Council has announced they will be awarding one $1,500 scholarship to a Kentucky student already attending college who has demonstrated academic success, equine industry involvement and community service for the Summer 2019 Semester.  

    The Equine Scholarship will be awarded to students currently enrolled with a university or college in Kentucky in an equine-related major or a horse-related program for the Summer 2019 semester.  Some examples of courses of studies for which the scholarships are intended are Equine Science/Studies, Equine Business Management, Equine Therapy, Pre-Veterinarian, Farrier Training, Professional Jockey Certificate, Professional Horsemen’s Certificate, etc.  Applicants must be student members of the Kentucky Horse Council.

    “The Kentucky Horse Council is thrilled to offer a scholarship to a college student in Kentucky for the Summer 2019 semester,” says Kentucky Horse Council Executive Director Katy Ross.  “Education is an important part of our mission and we look forward to supporting the efforts of a deserving student as they explore a future in the equine industry. Scholarship resources for summer classes are minimal and we hope to be able to aid students who are pursuing their studies year-round.”     

    Applications for the scholarship will be accepted until May 1, 2019.  The scholarship will be awarded on May 15. The student is required to be a member of the Kentucky Horse Council. Student memberships are free and interested students may sign up at www.kentuckyhorse.org.

    To download the scholarship application, visit www.kentuckyhorse.org.

    ABOUT THE KENTUCKY HORSE COUNCIL - The Kentucky Horse Council is a non-profit organization dedicated, through education and leadership, to the protection and development of the Kentucky equine community. The Kentucky Horse Council provides educational programs and information, outreach and communication to Kentucky horse owners and enthusiasts, equine professional networking opportunities through KENA, trail riding advocacy, health and welfare programs, and personal liability insurance and other membership benefits.  The specialty Kentucky Horse Council license plate, featuring a foal lying in the grass, provides the primary source of revenue for KHC programs

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